Conversations Matter when someone is thinking about suicide

I am worried someone I know may be thinking about suicide.
What do I say? What do I do?

When someone is thinking about suicide

Many of us will notice changes in people around us and get the feeling that “something is not right”. You may not want to say anything for fear of making the situation worse or because you don’t know what to say if they confirm your concerns. While these conversations can be very difficult and confronting, there is a lot you can do.

This resource will give you basic tips to help you talk to someone you are worried may be thinking about suicide.

You can watch it as an online presentation or download it as a printed fact sheet or audio podcast by using the links below.

Conversations Matter when someone is thinking about suicide

Conversations Matter when someone is thinking about suicide

You can download the resource as a printed fact sheet or an audio podcast by using the links below.

NEW: series of shortened podcasts now available to download.

Factsheet: When someone is thinking about suicide Factsheet: When someone is thinking about suicide (994 KB)

FULL podcast (female voice) - Thinking about suicide FULL podcast (female voice) - Thinking about suicide (19536 KB)

NEW: short podcast 1 (male voice) - Thinking about suicide NEW: short podcast 1 (male voice) - Thinking about suicide (4336 KB)

NEW: short podcast 2 (male voice) - Thinking about suicide NEW: short podcast 2 (male voice) - Thinking about suicide (5079 KB)

NEW: short podcast 3 (male voice) - Thinking about suicide NEW: short podcast 3 (male voice) - Thinking about suicide (4758 KB)

NEW: short podcast summary (male voice) - Thinking about suicide NEW: short podcast summary (male voice) - Thinking about suicide (3274 KB)

FULL podcast (male voice) - Thinking about suicide FULL podcast (male voice) - Thinking about suicide (17452 KB)

Supporting links

Services and supports

  • Lifeline
    24-hour national telephone crisis counselling service and online counselling
    Telephone: 13 11 14; or www.lifeline.org.au

 

  • Kids Helpline
    Free confidential 24 hour telephone and online counselling for young people between 5 and 18  Telephone: 1800 55 1800; or www.kidshelp.com.au

 

  • Suicide Call Back Service
    24-hour national telephone counselling service to people 18 years and over and online services
    Telephone: 1300 659 467; www.suicidecallbackservice.org.au

 

  • Mindhealthconnect
    Website aggregates mental health resources and content from the leading health organisations
    www.mindhealthconnect.org.au

 

  • beyondblue: National depression initiative
    24-hour telephone support and online chat service and links to local services
    Telephone: 1300 22 4636; www.beyondblue.org.au

 

Useful training

  • LivingWorks Australia
    Targeted training for communities, caregivers and professionals - www.livingworks.com.au

 

  • Mental Health First Aid
    Training for those assisting adults, young people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Vietnamese communities with mental health problems or in a mental crisis - https://www.mhfa.com.au/cms/

 

For a more comprehensive list of services and resources, refer to the Supporting Information section of the website


To hear Jaelea Skehan, Director of the Hunter Institute of Mental Health, give a brief overview of how to talk to someone bereaved by suicide, you can stream or download the podcast below, courtesy of the Community Broadcasting Association of Australia: 

CBAA Podcast - When someone we know is struggling CBAA Podcast - When someone we know is struggling (2449 KB)

CBAA Podcast - When someone we know is struggling2 CBAA Podcast - When someone we know is struggling2 (2628 KB)





References

The Conversations Matter resources have been developed by the Hunter Institute of Mental Health. The roll-out of the project across NSW is being supported by the NSW Mental Health Commission.

The resources have been developed based on a set of core principles. These principles were developed as the result of a review of research evidence and thematic analysis of current programs and approaches, extensive sector consultation across educational, workplace, family and community settings, as well as identified target group community consultations and consultations with Aboriginal communities.

The core principles were then subject to review by three panels of experts in suicide prevention working across various settings and with various target populations.

For a list of specific references for this resource, click here: 

References - When someone is thinking about suicide References - When someone is thinking about suicide (409 KB)